More views of EUH – 2

More views of the Emory University Hospital – Tower building

In a prior post the subject was the main building of Emory University Hospital in Atlanta (More views of EUH – 1). This post concentrates on the very new and modern Tower building.

Here the building is seen from the pedestrian bridge connecting the buildings across Clifton Road.

The Tower building seen from across Clifton Road

Looking west provides grand views of the Atlanta skyline

Each building has a café with surprisingly tasty and modestly priced food.

Other posts with images from Emory University Hospital:

More views of EUH – 1New and OldArt at Emory University Hospital

Monday Window – June 7, 2021Monday Window – May 31, 2021Monday Window – May 24, 2021

Emory University HospitalAtlanta Skyline

.:. © 2021 Ludwig Keck

More views of EUH – 1

More views of the Emory University Hospital – main building

Parking is available in a multi-story structure across the street from the main building of Emory University Hospital. There are elevated pedestrian connectors to get to the various building. Here is a view out the huge glass sidewall of the bridge walking from parking to the main building.

This building dates from 1945 as can be seen in the lintel of the entrance.

The building is set back from the street and there is a parklike area in front.

Here is a pano-stitch made from a group of photos taken closer to the building.

Inside, as you would expect, besides the state-of-the-art medical facilities, there are some nods to the early days.

Here is the stained glass window of the chapel room

There a couple more photos that were included to an earlier post, New and Old.

.:. © 2021 Ludwig Keck

Crowd Panos

Photographing Concerts and their Audiences

 

For as long as I can remember, I have always enjoyed showing the audience when photographing concerts. Invariably there is no way to step back far enough to capture the expansive crowd. Nor do I have a wide angle lens that can take it all in. My solution has been to make a panoramic image by stitching together overlapping views. Like this:

Evening Concert – PC Town Center  —  CLICK picture – with luck your browser will show it bigger

Sadly I can no longer link to a viewer that shows panos well, but with luck your browser will do a reasonable job.

The image here was stitched from eight separate exposures. Here are four of them.

Take a closer look at these four. You can see that stitching them faces some interesting obstacles. Yes, The photos show lots of noise. These photos were taken in the evening, night might be a better word. All at f/5.6 and 1/250s with the camera allowed to adjust the sensitivity (auto-ISO). My old camera doesn’t do so well at ISO 5000 to 25600.  On the left end the light evening sky tricked the camera into underexposing the people and I had to boost the shadows – always bad for noise. On the right end the camera reached ISO 25600 and all the noise that comes with that. I do use some noise removal app for these, but that is another story.

In the minute or so that it took to get this set people moved around quite a bit. Some people even walked along in front. That is one huge problem for stitching. Another is more subtle. Look at the lamp post. In one image it is quite bent, straight in the last. That tells you my lens produces a good about of barrel distortion. These problems, and even exposure nonuniformities are easily solved my my stitching program, Microsoft Image Composite Editor, ICE.

On the bottom it says: Camera motion: rotating motion. Stitched 8 of 8 images. Spans 169.3° horizontally, 48.7° vertically. You can see how the program ballooned the images to correct for distortion, moved them up and down for best alignment and found were to cut  from one to the next. Oh, there are stitching artifacts. In a crowd with everybody moving not even the best AI, for that matter nt even old-fashioned human intelligence, could get it perfect. ICE offers a number of different projections as you can see. For this I stayed with the default cylindrical projection.

The four steps at the top describe the major functions, Import, Stitch, Crop, and Export. In the cropping function it even offers to fill the areas around the edges with “context matching fill”. I did not make use of that for this pano.

The final step is to export. Sadly the Deep Zoom and Photosynth options are no longer of use. Time has marched on and Microsoft has given up on those tools. Even ICE is pretty much orphaned, although still available for download from Microsoft. I chose to export a full quality (100%) JPG image. You can see that it is 18098 pixels wide. That makes for a 98.78 megapixel image. I did go back and trimmed top and bottom, see first image above. The file size still came out as 99.6 MB. Yes, I did scale it down for this post.

Here is another pano. This one is made up of just two images. I am using this as the “featured image” so WordPress does not have to choke on the wide panorama.

Evening Concert – PC Town Center

Now for some other photos from this first Concert on the Green at the Peachtree Corners Town Center with the band Sister Hazel. The lead singer is Ken Block

 

.:.

© 2019 Ludwig Keck

Spoiled your photo?

Not all spoiled photos are bad!

As I was preparing a post for another blog, I was looking for photos of cafe doors. Searching my archives I came across one that was a nice enough image but for some reason or another I took it with the camera way cockeyed. No idea what I was thinking at the time. The other photos in the series were perfectly alright, but this one was the only one that really fit my story.

Here is the original.

45 South Cafe

45 South Cafe

Just not the way I want it. OK, let’s go to Microsoft Image Composite Editor. Nothing to “composite” here, just one frame. ICE won’t accept a single file. So I duplicated it. Loaded it into ICE, told it I was using “Rotating Motion” and had it “Stitch”. It will do that with two copies of the same photo. Then it lets you manipulate it as you like. For “Projection” I used “Perspective”. This let me do some perspective correction as well as rotating the image freely. Now I had a picture I liked. Saved it without cropping.

Since the image was rotated rather strongly the exported image showed a lot of black around the useful picture. That didn’t look so good. Paint to the rescue! Just drop in “white” in each of the black triangles and here we are. What do you think, will this work?

Evening at 45 South Cafe

Evening at 45 South Cafe

 


.:.

© 2016 Ludwig Keck

 

The Unplanned Pano

Panoramas are fun, even unplanned ones

This old, long “retired”, gasoline station intrigued me. We were driving along in the rural part of Georgia, up in the northern part, when we came upon this sight. We stopped and I took a number of photos. Only when I was doing my post-processing back home did I realize that I had not taken a overall photo that showed the whole place.

Well, that what the “Create” tab in Photo Gallery is for. The first photo showed the building nicely, the third one included the fuel island, there were a number of other views as I walked around the place, and by the tenth photo I had gotten back close to the starting point and showed the pumps, including the ancient one.

Here are the two shots that together cover the whole place.

You can clearly see that I had not taken these photos from the same spot. Making a pano from these would be asking a great deal from Photo Gallery. And indeed it was asking too much. Here is what it could do. Amazing as it is, but the top left of the marque sign just didn’t match.

Old Gas Station - Pano

Old Gas Station – Pano

So on to the nest better tool, in fact the best there is, Microsoft Image Composite Editor. It too had problems, I tried the different planar motion settings and rotating motion. There were still disturbing stitching artifacts. So I did some perspective correction on each image and tried again. That was better.

Old Gas Station - ICE pano

Old Gas Station – ICE pano

A fairly good stitch but the building was way too distorted. Some more fiddling and this was more acceptable. There is a bend in the fuel island base, but I thinks it is not too bad.

Old Gas Station

Old Gas Station

Now with some cropping we have a pretty good photo of the whole place. It still amazes me what Image Composite Editor can do, even with images that clearly were not taken with stitching in mind.

Old Gas Station

Old Gas Station

 

Also see my post at Two Cameras – Two ViewsArtifacts: Fuel Pump


.:.

© 2016 Ludwig Keck