Resolution

Happy New Year!

A New Year Resolution for me and to share

 

PTC Town Center

It wasn’t meant to be this image. My Happy New Year post was preempted by events. Let me explain. I had been taking photos of light decorations. To get the exposure right I experimented a bit and found that 1/50s at f/4 and ISO 100 worked for the effect I was after. That meant manual settings, of course, including not letting the camera adjust the ISO setting for me – all manual. Then last Friday I wanted to get some images of the progress of our new Town Center construction. The fist shot became this “post card”.

We had glorious sunshine. So bright I could barely see the camera settings. Actually, I didn’t even try. Now if you remember the “f-16 rule” you already know what happened. An exposure of f/16 with the ISO and shutter speed the same usually gives good exposure on a bright sunny day. With ISO at 100 and 1/50 second that one stop over, with f/4 that four more stops. Overexposing by 5 stops is definitely “unrecoverable”. So here it is in all is embarrassing glory. See, I did manage to make something of it!

Moral and Resolution for 2018

Before putting the camera away, set Auto ISO sensitivity control to ON. Set the camera to any auto mode. For me that is usually Auto Aperture with f/8, letting the camera pick the shutter speed. That way when grabbing the camera for a quick shot you will very likely get a decently exposed image for that first photo. Then you can take a few seconds to set the camera more appropriately.

I do have the habit of checking the histogram for the first photo in a series. That saved me last Friday. I set proper exposure and got the rest properly exposed.

So that’s my bit of advise to you for the coming year. May 2018 bring you glorious images all year long!

 

.:.

© 2017 Ludwig Keck

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See my latest venture

Come visit me at

1stAngel Arts Magazine

I have joined 1stAngel Arts Magazine and will be contributing in a section called Real World Photography. Join me and my colleagues there for news, photos, interviews and more.

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And Café Ludwig here will get busier as well, so keep checking back!

OneDrive Improved Again

OneDrive links now go right to light box view

Storing images for pictures in blog posts in OneDrive makes it easy to link back to the source album. In my blogs Gallery Ludwig and Silver Canvas I have been doing that for many years. Microsoft has made a lot of changes in that time. The Microsoft “cloud” depository started with Live Spaces, became SkyDrive and more recently OneDrive. In that time links in blog posts to photos remained intact. Even when the folders were moved around and reorganized. A very nice feature and very considerate and useful service by the Microsoft team.

How the images were displayed has changed many times too. Sometimes these changes were for the better, at other times not so much. In the past year links to photos would look something like this:

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The surround was a pleasant black, there was an information panel at the right and a line of thumbnails of other pictures in the album at the bottom. You could click the image to present it in a nice “light box” view – just the image, nice and large.

Today that changed. Now you are taken directly to a light box view. The panel on the right is gone, but the information can be brought up as an overlay. Try it here:

Click the image to be taken to my OneDrive album “Silver Canvas” with this image in a large light box view.

When you move the pointer into the window, links and other information will surround the image. In the lower right corner there is an “i-link” – see the red arrow in the illustration here.

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Click the “information” icon and the data for the picture will be displayed.

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Slide shows go full screen, not just full browser window, but full monitor. That is very nice. NOTE: The images in my blog posts are scaled to 1024px so you will not get the full effect on a high resolution monitor.

This change affects not only this and new posts, but works just as beautifully for all earlier posts. You can see the whole album by clicking “View folder” in the top menu bar. The pictures are nicely arranged in their correct proportions.

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But Wait, there’s more! Hold down the Ctrl key and roll your mouse wheel. The display scales as you would expect in a browser window, but here the thumbnails are scaled and rearranged to fit the browser window. Really, really nice!

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One very nice improvement in the development of OneDrive.

Thank you friends at Microsoft!

.:.

© 2015 Ludwig Keck

Happy New Year!

My “Happy New Year” Images

Happy New Year 2015

My most frequent posts in 2014 have been photos to Gallery Ludwig and “café art” to Silver Canvas. I wanted a colorful, cheerful image for my well-wishes. One that would be appropriate for the photo gallery and that could also be made into a delightful art piece for Silver Canvas. I found some butterfly photos from Florida. The flowers seemed to overpower the gulf fritillary so these photos remained “asleep” in my archive. See what I mean:LJK12615-P1-1024

There were several in the series, some with the butterfly in flight. At a 1/125 second shutter speed the butterfly was “no catch”, way too fast. But it kept coming back to that flower. What attracted it? Nectar? Oh, maybe the hot Florida sun had started a bit of fermentation? He, he, chuckle. So that lead to the cropped and manipulated images shared on the other blogs.

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Drunken Butterfly

All the best wishes to my friends and visitors for a prosperous 2015!

Happy New Year!

.:.

© 2014 Ludwig Keck

Museum Photography 2

Visit to the Delta Flight Museum

Delta Airlines recently opened the Delta Flight Museum to the public. The museum is located in two historic hangars, now on the Delta Airline corporate campus. A most interesting place to visit. My visit there also provided me with some additional thoughts and tips on museum photography to go along with my earlier article, Museum Photography.

The Delta Flight Museum is housed in two connected maintenance hangars dating from the 1940s. These historic hangars are now located on the Delta corporate campus adjoining the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. When you visit, be prepared to show ids at the security gate.

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Two historic aircraft maintenance hangers house the Delta Flight Museum
This very wide-angle photo is stitched together from two smartphone photos

Unlike most museum artifact, aircraft are rather large. This makes getting them into pictures difficult unless you have a very wide-angle lens. I stitch photos together. Photo Gallery does a fine job of that. Microsoft Image Composite Editor (ICE) does a superb job. I use both. ICE is especially handy when some perspective correction also needs to be done.

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Delta’s first 767 aircraft is now a museum inside the museum 

The largest item inside the museum is a Boing 767 aircraft. LJK13046-P4-2000Inside the rear portion has been converted into an exhibit area with display cases along the sides.

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The Spirit of Delta – Boing 767 aircraft purchased for Delta by its employees, retirees, and friends in the financially difficult times in 1982.

A number of items, like luggage carts, have been turned into display cases and there are numerous interactive displays giving information about the artifacts and the history of flight.

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The Delta Flight Museum, like other museums, is illuminated for a pleasant experince by visitors not for cameras. The light requires high ISO settings and the techniques of noise reduction described in the earlier article. The high contrast range, illustrated here by the view into the “business end” of an aircraft engine and the cockpit, requires HDR processing. That technique was also covered in the prior post. For the images here I used primarily the “shadows” slider in Photo Gallery and the HDR effect in onOne Perfect Effects 8.

The many historical items take the visitor back to the early days of Delta, indeed to the early days of passenger flight. There are many interesting artifacts like the early “amenity kit”. Yes, indeed, there was a time when smoking was common in airplanes.

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Early day customer being assisted in boarding flight.
Tableau at the Delta Flight Museum.
Atlanta, Georgia

When we look at what flying was like some 85 years ago when Delta got started in the passenger business, we smile at how plain and  simple it all was. The equipment was outright crude, and so was the merchandising and the service.

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Even I remember those simple days of flying. On my first flight on a DC-3 when we arrived at our destination the pilot hopped out, unlocked the door to the terminal and came back and unloaded the luggage. The Delta Flight Museum has the first Delta DC-3, now beautifully restored.

Douglas DC-3 aircraft at the Delta Flight Museum

Douglas DC-3 aircraft at the Delta Flight Museum

Of course, I couldn’t resist this opportunity for a “selfie” in the polished metal of the DC-3.

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The Delta Flight Museum is still a work in progress. There are several aircraft outside the hangars that have not (yet) been integrated into the museum experience for visitors. Photography is permitted “for personal use”. There is a museum shop, of course. Be sure to pick up a memento there.

.:.

© 2014 Ludwig Keck