Monday Window – 1

Looking at and looking in

Jealousy – that’s the reason for this post. All the “likes” are going over to 2C2V. So I decided to chime in and do some Monday Window fun here. But, but, up in the header it says “chats and tips about photography”. This is a chat — not enough?  OK, I’ll think of some tip. Let me look through my archives and notes.

Ah ha, here it is. Some photos I took for a photography course. Take a look at this photo:

LJK_8715-XW1-1024

You can see the windows reflect the sky beautifully. When light is reflected on a smooth surface like glass or water, especially at shallow angles like here, the reflected light is strongly polarized. No, I won’t go into the physics. With strong reflections our photographs loot at the window, and not in the window. That can make for wonderful images, but what if you want to look in?

This is where the polarizing filter comes in. You rotate the filter so the polarized light is either strongly passed through or strongly suppressed. In fact the photo above was made with a polarizing filter on the lens. It was set to maximize the reflection. No turn it ninety degrees and here is the result:

LJK_8714-XW1-1024

Now much of the reflected light is stopped an we can look into the windows. You can see that it makes quite a difference, but it is not perfect.

What if you don’t have a polarizing filter? I did use the word “angle”. Yes, the angle at which you look at the reflecting surface makes quite a difference. Another thing that might be under your control is what is reflected. Bright sky will show up strongly. Seeing the reflection of a dark building might be so low that it is hardly noticeable.  So changing your position might make all the difference. Of course it all depends on what you are after, looking in or looking at.

Here are a couple of photos showing the difference your position can make.

Photowalk - Duluth, GA 5Oct2013

Photowalk – Duluth, GA 5Oct2013

Photowalk - Duluth, GA 5Oct2013

Photowalk – Duluth, GA 5Oct2013

Well, that’s my little tip for you. Hope you also enjoyed the pictures.


 

Also see my Monday Window series

.:.

© 2016 Ludwig Keck

Homesteads

Homes from times gone by

For a recent post in the Thursday Doors challenge I had dug out a couple of photos from my archives. One shows the “Salzburger House” in Ebenezer, Georgia and the other a “Tenant House” situated in McDaniel Farm Park, Duluth, Georgia. There is a tiny bit more information in my Two Cameras – Two Views post.

Then today I was doing some close up photography of a bouquet of flower when I remembered seeing a couple of coins with old homes on them. I cleaned them up a bit for their “sitting”.

Here is my “homestead collection”.

Salzburger House 1755

Salzburger House 1755


 

.:.

© 2016 Ludwig Keck

Monday Window Blogging

Come join the fun!

Participate in the “Monday Window” weekly post. Sharpen your photography skills, blogging techniques, and enjoy what others do on the same topic. You will find it fun and inspiring.

Click the “button” for more information.

MondayWindow-600

Follow the tag “Monday Window“.

Get a sneak peek at my collection.

LK-MWGallery

.:.

© 2016 Ludwig Keck

My Liebster Award

 

To my great surprise, this blog was nominated for the “Liebster Award” an award that is passed from blogger to blogger in order to help readers find new blogs to follow and for bloggers new to the community to expand their reach.

The nomination came from a new-found fellow blogger friend who participated with me in a Blogging 101 training session. My award came from Irmgard Rahn and her mostly German language blog BOOKS OF REALITY. She received the nomination from a fellow Blogging 101 participant and describes the award in her post Mein liebster Award.

The rules of the Liebster Award are these:LiebsterAward-badge

1. Acknowledge the blog who nominated you and display the award.
2. Answer 10 questions that the blogger gives you.
3. Give 10 random facts about yourself.
4. Nominate 10 blogs with under 200 followers.
5. Notify the bloggers that you have nominated them.
6. Give them 10 questions to answer.

The first rule is satisfied above. Never one to follow the expected path, the next two rules, to answer the tem questions posed and to present tem random facts, I answer in my blog Ludwig’s Ramblings. This blog, Café Ludwig, has not been my place for many personal chats. I used the newly launched Ludwig’s Ramblings for interactions and assigned tasks in the Blogging 101 course. It seems fitting to me to make it part of my Liebster Award response, so go there for my answers and tidbits.

For my nominees I have also chosen from Blogging 101 colleagues.

… and my nominees are

Third Time Lucky

through my lens

PHOTO ISABELLE

Down Many Roads …

GARDEN MUSE

PHOTOGRAPHY IN PEARLS

Birds as Poetry

snapshots of everything

Dutch goes the Photo!

45ragestreet.org

I found the blogs that I have nominated above to be delightful, pleasant and interesting. I hope that you, my dear reader, will visit them and enjoy these blogs. They may not yet be the most polished in many ways, but I am sure you will find them “a good read”.

Here are my questions for my nominees

  1. How long does it take you from the moment an idea pops up to pushing the Publish button?
  2. How much time do you spend online in a typical week?
  3. What other passions do you have besides blogging?
  4. What do you value in blogs you read?
  5. How often do you carry a camera with you?
  6. Are pictures more or less important than the story in your posts?
  7. How long have you been blogging?
  8. Do you have more than one blog?
  9. Have you bought any art from an individual artist online?
  10. What means do you use to follow blogs, computer, tablet, smartphone?

===================

LK8_5231-p2-1024This being a photography related blog, it would be unseemly to not include a photo.

How about just a close-up of a tag? This one even leads you to yet another blog of mine if you just click the image.

Will that do?

—-

.:.

© 2016 Ludwig Keck

Shadows in flash pictures

Bring out what’s hiding in the shadows

Pictures taken indoors with on-camera-flash usually have dingy, dark backgrounds. There is little that can be done about the behavior of light. An object at twice the distance from the flash will get only a quarter as much light. That means it will be darker in the picture.

There is no need to live with that problem. Post-processing, just a little bit of adjustments, can substantially enhance such photos. That is what the Shadows slider in Photo Gallery can correct substantially. With some judicious use of the Hightlights slider, and maybe a bit of adjustments with the others, a flash photo can be made to look quite good.

Here are a couple of screen shots to illustrate what can be done with a flash picture.

Shadows-01

This is the oroginal photograph, just the way it came from the camera. It looks like what you expect from a flash picture, the objects close to the camera, the table and chairs here, are properly exposed, things farther away look progressively darker.

Next the picture with some enhancements.

shadows-06

The Shadows slider was moved all the way to the right to make darker areas of the photo lighter. Sometimes such a drastic adjustment may turn out to be way too much, but for this picture it worked well. The Highlights slider is moved a little to the left to make the lightes areas a bit darker. The Contrast slider was also moved to the right jut a little bit to increase contrast.  Note how much lighter the far wall is, it looks almost normal they way you would see it.

Other photo editors have similar tools. Sometimes they have different names. In Picasa the Fill Light slider brings the details out of the shadows. The Shadows slider makes intermediate toned areas darker. Careful use and a little trial and error will help you get the best pictures out of your flash photos.

shadows-05

.:.

© 2016 Ludwig Keck