There are many nooks in Café Ludwig, this corner is for chats and tips about cameras, enhancing,  manipulating and sharing photos. Ludwig.Gallery is one of the front doors. Look around and enjoy!



Happy New Year!

A New Year Resolution for me and to share


PTC Town Center

It wasn’t meant to be this image. My Happy New Year post was preempted by events. Let me explain. I had been taking photos of light decorations. To get the exposure right I experimented a bit and found that 1/50s at f/4 and ISO 100 worked for the effect I was after. That meant manual settings, of course, including not letting the camera adjust the ISO setting for me – all manual. Then last Friday I wanted to get some images of the progress of our new Town Center construction. The fist shot became this “post card”.

We had glorious sunshine. So bright I could barely see the camera settings. Actually, I didn’t even try. Now if you remember the “f-16 rule” you already know what happened. An exposure of f/16 with the ISO and shutter speed the same usually gives good exposure on a bright sunny day. With ISO at 100 and 1/50 second that one stop over, with f/4 that four more stops. Overexposing by 5 stops is definitely “unrecoverable”. So here it is in all is embarrassing glory. See, I did manage to make something of it!

Moral and Resolution for 2018

Before putting the camera away, set Auto ISO sensitivity control to ON. Set the camera to any auto mode. For me that is usually Auto Aperture with f/8, letting the camera pick the shutter speed. That way when grabbing the camera for a quick shot you will very likely get a decently exposed image for that first photo. Then you can take a few seconds to set the camera more appropriately.

I do have the habit of checking the histogram for the first photo in a series. That saved me last Friday. I set proper exposure and got the rest properly exposed.

So that’s my bit of advise to you for the coming year. May 2018 bring you glorious images all year long!



© 2017 Ludwig Keck

Formal Portrait

Formal full-length portrait photography

A some-what fictitious approach to a photo shoot.

OK, GB, I am just about ready with the camera here. Are you ready on the set?

“Yes, I’m standing on the marked spot. Which is more photogenic, my left side or my right?”

Your right side works better, GB. That way you are looking away from the rocks behind you. That gives you visually open “breathing space”. However, your front looks a little frumpy and rumpled. May I suggest you turn your whole body about 90 degrees so we see your right side and your head in profile.

“How is this?”

Great angle. You are leaning a bit too much to the front. Makes you look like you are about to flee the set. Can you stand a bit more upright?

“Well, flight was on my mind, ha ha. This better?”

Much better. I like when you reach up higher, your neckline is more elegant. But now your feet are too far apart. That makes you look heavy. Can you put your weight more on one leg and move the other a bit forward. Either one, as you please.

“Hey, I am the talent and it is I who is supposed to be fussy. Are all photographers so bossy?”

Well, the good photographers make sure their subjects look their best. Now your right leg is just a bit too casual. Can you pull it back a bit?

“Picky, picky. Next you’ll complain about the light. All right, this better?”

Great Blue Heron, Pinckneyville Park, Berkeley Lake, Georgia

Oh, you look great now! We’ll call it a wrap. Thank you for your time.


© 2017 Ludwig Keck


Is it true that red attracts attention?

It must be. You are reading this. The color red has been credited with being the most readily noticed by us humans. It has been used in products, advertising, and many other area to gain a little bit more attention. Just look around. You will find the color red all around you. I won’t disappoint you here either. So lets have some red.

Oh, you say, it’s about cars. Indeed it is. It is all about British cars. This is just a peek at the Atlanta British Car Fayre 2016. Here are links to some more, and maybe more exciting, views.

British Windows

British Doors

Disclaimer: Yes, I am doing a research project. Thank you for participating.


© 2016 Ludwig Keck

Street Photography

A Little Bit of Street Photography

The term “street photography” usually has a very precise definition, but what it means precisely depends a great deal on who is doing the defining. Mostly it means photography in and of man-made surroundings, often with humans in and interacting with their environment. Much street photography is centered on the human element, while other practitioners prefer the interaction of light, shapes, lines, and shadows.  Some specialists insist that the images must be presented in monochrome.

In this post the photography is mainly centered on the shapes, patterns, colors, and textures of the urban environment in Midtown Atlanta. By no means do I consider myself a street photographer. This small collection is quite coincidental and comes from a photo walk that really centered on windows and doors.

Here are my photo colleagues intent on seeing and imaging the Midtown environment.

In and round Peachtree Street in Midtown Atlanta

This is one of a quartet of posts with images from this short walk around midtown. For the others see:


Monday Window – 32  “Midtown Atlanta”


Midtown Atlanta Doors


LK8-7454-X3-1200 - Copy

A Photo Walk in Midtown Atlanta




© 2016 Ludwig Keck

Spoiled your photo?

Not all spoiled photos are bad!

As I was preparing a post for another blog, I was looking for photos of cafe doors. Searching my archives I came across one that was a nice enough image but for some reason or another I took it with the camera way cockeyed. No idea what I was thinking at the time. The other photos in the series were perfectly alright, but this one was the only one that really fit my story.

Here is the original.

45 South Cafe

45 South Cafe

Just not the way I want it. OK, let’s go to Microsoft Image Composite Editor. Nothing to “composite” here, just one frame. ICE won’t accept a single file. So I duplicated it. Loaded it into ICE, told it I was using “Rotating Motion” and had it “Stitch”. It will do that with two copies of the same photo. Then it lets you manipulate it as you like. For “Projection” I used “Perspective”. This let me do some perspective correction as well as rotating the image freely. Now I had a picture I liked. Saved it without cropping.

Since the image was rotated rather strongly the exported image showed a lot of black around the useful picture. That didn’t look so good. Paint to the rescue! Just drop in “white” in each of the black triangles and here we are. What do you think, will this work?

Evening at 45 South Cafe

Evening at 45 South Cafe



© 2016 Ludwig Keck